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A blog, an informational website akin to a diary, showcases entries in reverse chronological sequence. Initially, blogs were managed by individual persons or small teams, but have since morphed into multi-author blogs (MABs) with contributions from various entities boosting blog traffic. The late 1990s saw blogs rise in popularity, thanks to web publishing tools that simplified the process for non-technical users to publish content, reducing the need for HTML[1] or programming expertise. The process of updating or adding content to a blog is known as ‘blogging’. MABs typically exhibit writings from several authors and are present in various platforms such as newspapers, universities, and advocacy groups. These blogs frequently merge with microblogging platforms like Twitter. The incorporation of blogs into news media has made a substantial impact, offering alternative viewpoints, delivering real-time updates, swaying public opinion, and promoting transparency in journalism.

Terms definitions
1. HTML ( HTML ) HTML, standing for HyperText Markup Language, is the bedrock of the modern internet. It was first introduced by Tim Berners-Lee in the 1980s and has seen numerous transformations and enhancements over the years. HTML is crucial for organizing web content, encompassing everything from the text we peruse to the multimedia we engage with. Different editions of HTML, including HTML 2.0, HTML 3.2, and HTML 4.0, have been released throughout the years, each one improving and broadening the scope of its predecessor. The latest version, HTML5, was standardized in 2014 and brought with it a plethora of new features such as support for video and audio, local storage options, and additional semantic elements. HTML is also vital for SEO (Search Engine Optimization) and digital accessibility.
Blog (Wikipedia)

A blog (a truncation of "weblog") is an informational website consisting of discrete, often informal diary-style text entries (posts). Posts are typically displayed in reverse chronological order so that the most recent post appears first, at the top of the web page. In the 2000s, blogs were often the work of a single individual, occasionally of a small group, and often covered a single subject or topic. In the 2010s, "multi-author blogs" (MABs) emerged, featuring the writing of multiple authors and sometimes professionally edited. MABs from newspapers, other media outlets, universities, think tanks, advocacy groups, and similar institutions account for an increasing quantity of blog traffic. The rise of Twitter and other "microblogging" systems helps integrate MABs and single-author blogs into the news media. Blog can also be used as a verb, meaning to maintain or add content to a blog.

The emergence and growth of blogs in the late 1990s coincided with the advent of web publishing tools that facilitated the posting of content by non-technical users who did not have much experience with HTML or computer programming. Previously, knowledge of such technologies as HTML and File Transfer Protocol had been required to publish content on the Web, and early Web users therefore tended to be hackers and computer enthusiasts. As of the 2010s, the majority are interactive Web 2.0 websites, allowing visitors to leave online comments, and it is this interactivity that distinguishes them from other static websites. In that sense, blogging can be seen as a form of social networking service. Indeed, bloggers not only produce content to post on their blogs but also often build social relations with their readers and other bloggers. Blog owners or authors often moderate and filter online comments to remove hate speech or other offensive content. There are also high-readership blogs which do not allow comments.

Many blogs provide commentary on a particular subject or topic, ranging from philosophy, religion, and arts to science, politics, and sports. Others function as more personal online diaries or online brand advertising of a particular individual or company. A typical blog combines text, digital images, and links to other blogs, web pages, and other media related to its topic. Most blogs are primarily textual, although some focus on art (art blogs), photographs (photoblogs), videos (video blogs or "vlogs"), music (MP3 blogs), and audio (podcasts). In education, blogs can be used as instructional resources; these are referred to as edublogs. Microblogging is another type of blogging, featuring very short posts.

'Blog' and 'blogging' are now loosely used for content creation and sharing on social media, especially when the content is long-form and one creates and shares content on regular basis. So, one could be maintaining a blog on Facebook or blogging on Instagram.

A 2022 estimate suggested that there were over 600 million public blogs out of more than 1.9 billion websites.

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